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Badgingarra Nature Trail now Iain Wilson Nature Trail - Cervantes Accommodation, Tours & Information.
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Badgingarra Nature Trail now Iain Wilson Nature Trail

53km east of Cervantes, straddling the Brand Highway and Bibby Road, the Badgingarra National park features the Badgingarra Nature Trail. The trail begins west of Brand Highway near the Badgingarra roadhouse and returns to the same point, covering a distance of around 2 kilometers with an optional 1.5km lookout detour. Traverse time is around 90 mins (135 including detour), and care must be taken crossing the Brand Highway, especially with children. Features of the trail may not be immediately obvious, and to take full advantage of the experience you must take the time to look around. Binoculars are helpful and sightings of Emu and Kangaroo are common. Take a walk amongst the beautiful fauna and flora. Badgingarra National Park covers 13,121 hectares, overlooking low undulating plains with low scrub and extensive wildflowers in the spring, including many species of Kangaroo Paws, Banksia and Verticordia. Watch out for Western Grey Kangaroos, Emus, Wedgetail Eagles, Bustards and numerous reptiles within the park. The Badgingarra Nature Trail offers visitors a beautiful walk through the park. It takes approximately 90 minutes, and you are likely to find the local emus and kangaroos a common sight along the trail.

BADGINGARRA’S Nature Trail has been renamed the Iain Wilson Nature Trail in memory of local pioneer farmer and land carer Iain Wilson. The 1.5km trail in the 13,000ha Badgingarra National Park is opposite the roadhouse and west of the Brand Highway. The walk trail extends through sandplain and lateritic breakaway vegetation types, according to DEC flora conservation officer Niall Sheehy. “We are living in one of the most biodiverse floral hotspots in the world,” he said. “The incredible floral diversity is due to the lack of geological activity – both volcanic and glacial – over such a long period of time in which the flora diversified and speciated. “These are very old soils and plants have had a long time to evolve. “Much of what we have in our lives, be it food or medicine, comes from plants and there could be a cure for cancer out there that we don’t yet know about.” Thelymitra pulcherrima, the Northern Queen of Sheba, from the orchid family, occurs right in the middle of the walk trail. Mr Sheehy said where the walk trail crossed the Dampier-Bunbury gas pipeline, a large number of smoke busesh (Conospermum species) germinated due to mechanical disturbance associated with the pipeline. Nearby Lesueur National Park contains more than 900 species of plants, comprising 10 per cent of the state’s known flora.